About Me

I’m a travel writer, trip director, communications specialist, and diversity trainer who is passionate about the intersection of social justice and technology.

My appreciation for gender empowerment stems from graduating from Wellesley College, where women’s aspirations and accomplishments were valued. I’ve studied in France and I’ve taught in public schools in Boston and San Antonio.

In 2016, I finished 27 months of service with the Peace Corps in Nicaragua, where I worked as an LGBT diversity trainer, social media manager, TEFL teacher trainer, and fundraised thousands of dollars for gender empowerment camps. Now, you might see me giving bike tours on the National Mall with DC Bike and Roll!

I’ve coordinated social media for  Wanderful, a women’s travel startup, and I’m currently a Visit.org storytelling ambassador, and I’ve written about travel, LGBTQ issues, mental health, and women’s empowerment for Go Abroad and Travel Latina. Here’s my writing portfolio. I’m also translating 11,000+ words of the Babyscripts mobile healthcare application to Spanish to reach a wider audience of Latina mothers.

I do translation work, editing, research, and social media consulting consistently and quickly. Whenever I work, I make sure everything I post goes the distance. I know the value of consistency, communication, and creativity. Everyone has a story to tell. Not only will I help you tell your story, I’ll make sure it is heard.

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Gift Guide for Women Travelers

Ready or not, the holiday season is upon us. It’s time to start making your gifting checklist for the women travelers in your life.

Whether you’re in #treatyoself mode or perusing options for that special travelista you know, there’s no better time than now.

Wondering what to get your sister who travels with her family of four? Do you have a burnt-out coworker who could use a bit of travel inspo? Or what about your best friend and her solo adventures?

Check out my gift guide for women who travel on Wanderful!

I’m as Migratory as a Monarch Butterfly

I’m as Migratory as a Monarch Butterfly

Dear friends,

This is an entry  I wrote on December, 2011, during a family visit to Mexico. I was in my senior year of college. I hadn’t published it until now, so while I’m a little late, the message still rings true. This week I’ve been staying with my grandma and enjoying her company and the delicious tacos, menudo, and pastries of León, Guanajuato.

I hope to finally see the Monarch butterflies when I go to Morelia on Tuesday. Enjoy!


I flew to Mexico and arrived in Morelia, Michoacan my birth town, at about midnight. Finally. It had been two years and I’m always restless to go back to Mexico. I stayed there for about 4 days and saw family, hiked, and basked in the sun that I missed so much. It was hard to believe that the beating, hot sun down here is the same one that teases us in Boston, where it begins to set at 3:30.

One restaurant that stuck out to me was the San Miguelito, where my aunt and cousin went. It’s famous for basically being a museum to San Antonio, the saint that women turn over so that they can find boyfriends. There was even a life-sized one there, turned on its head, accompanied by several advertisements of women seeking good men to marry. All of my photos of the place seem annoyingly upside down. I looked at the menu and decided to try Huitlacoche, which is the cooked fungus that grows on corn. It’s a delicacy there, but after a bite of some in my quesadilla, it tasted and looked just like cooked spinach.

The day before I left, I took a stroll past the huge aqueduct through the historic downtown, which has been around since the 1500s. I really missed the concept of a town plaza where people go to sit and relax, as they listen to the constant flow of water ebbing from the fountains-or children crying loudly, asking their parents to buy them that unnecessarily large sized tweetie balloon. I was basking in the 70 degree weather, and everyone could tell I was not from there because I was making a conscious effort to sit in the sun while they wore their hats and long sleeved shirts. “No, I’m not cold,” I’d say to them. “Your winter is my summer!”

Then came the bus ride to Leon. I thought I loved to recline in my seat but these Mexicans had me beat. Halfway there, I turned and saw half of them knocked out, reclining one after another like dominos. There was a movie about a cave playing (the only actor I recognized was the man who blew the whistle at the end of Titanic in search of survivors) but I lost interest after the only female lead died. How Wellesley of me. My favorite part of the 2.5 hour long journey to León is the ride over Lake Cuitzeo. It’s this large expanse of grayish blueish water teeming with white herons all over it, and the road glides right through the middle of it. The environmental studies side of me wonders how badly contaminated it is at this point, as there weren’t many fishermen out there at all.

I should stop here in order to describe León in its deserved detail, but I’ll leave with one thought. This morning I heated up my egg, tortilla and salsa and broke my fast with abuelita (grandma). Somehow the topic of the monarch butterflies emerged, and she marveled at the way in which four generations of them migrate each year from Canada to Michoacan (the state I was just in).

She lamented at the fact that deforestation is leaving them with less places to land, and how blood has been lost over the land that these creatures deserve to call home. On a brighter note, she asked me “¿Como deben saber a donde ir, año tras año, desde Canada hasta aqui?¿Que maravilloso, no?” (“How do they know where to go, year after year, from Canada all the way here? Isn’t it marvelous?”).

Well, the monarch butterlfies are just like me, I thought. They always just want to come back to Mexico.

I don’t know why, but I’m as restless as any one of those Monarch butterflies to leave the North for a while and join family here and there, and ultimately to stay at my grandma’s house for a while. I thought by now this urge would die down, but it seems just as strong as ever.

#SoloTravel: Making Couchsurfing Friends in Cartagena, Colombia!

#SoloTravel: Making Couchsurfing Friends in Cartagena, Colombia!

Day 1: Meeting new friends for my first Couchsurfing experience in Cartagena, Colombia.

I had traveled solo to Cartagena, Colombia, and I’d spent a day wandering the streets of the walled city. I’d also posted on the Couchsurfing facebook group to ask if anyone wanted to meet up. Couchsurfing is so much more than finding a place to crash for free. It’s a site for meeting and/or staying with locals all over the world, and it’s a great way to meet people while traveling solo.  A woman my age named Angie, who was visiting from Madellin, responded to my facebook post and invited me to a nearby beach,  La Playa Blanca on Isla Baru, with her and her friends.

Since I hadn’t couchsurfed with anyone in seven years, I knew that I just needed to be vulnerable and eager to learn about my new friends. In the morning of my beach trip, I met up with Angie, who is originally from the coast. She lives in Medellin and was visiting Cartagena. She wore the prettiest, most colorful sundress and then I met her friend Marticela (Marti), who is also a Caribeña living in Medellin. She was taking care of her parents’ house for the week. Marticela’s cousin and friend joined.

On the car ride to the beach, I was sitting in the backseat, surrounded by strangers who were basically asking me “So…who are you?” I explained that I was volunteering as an English teacher in Nicaragua, but that my interests have shifted from education to the women’s travel industry. Having a social media presence helped me show them about my passion for travel through my blog and instagram.

They asked me what I thought about Colombia, and I shared that I wanted to come back even though I hadn’t even left yet. There was so much to see and do. I told them that a lot of my friends made stereotypical cocaine reference before I came here. Heck, I even made a cocaine reference to a Colombian classmate of mine in college. I was ignorant of the fact that making a reference like this is insulting to someone whose country has suffered so much and is now recovering from its violent past.

“Oh, you didn’t know? It’s going to be a big drug fest at the beach,” they joked. We laughed and stopped for the most delicious gas station breakfast: beef empanadas with salsa. We drank tinto (coffee) from our small styrofoam cups, loaded up on snacks, and pressed on.

We got to the beach early and it wasn’t so crowded. We paid to rent an umbrella and some beach chairs and I slathered on my sunscreen. Vendors sold anything from seashell necklaces, to Club Colombia beer, to coconut oil all stopped by. I jumped in the water, and a  jet ski pulled a team of bouncing kids on a banana boat. All I could think of was Jaws. Just as I had harbored ridiculous images of the impending drug cartel war I’d imagined I’d experience in Colombia, I was irrationally thinking about sharks.

After swimming in the tranquil, light blue Caribbean, I came back to my new friends. We drank Club Clasica (which we tried to make sure had been sitting in a fridge that was at least turned on this morning) and got to know each other. I learned that Angie had experience hosting other couchsurfers before and that she enjoyed meeting foreigners.

cartagena-couchsurfing
Hi, new friends I just met an hour ago!

Continue reading “#SoloTravel: Making Couchsurfing Friends in Cartagena, Colombia!”

Top 5 Cities (Besides Mexico City) to Study Abroad in Mexico

Top 5 Cities (Besides Mexico City) to Study Abroad in Mexico

Mexico City seems to have become the mecca of study abroad in México. While, yes, it is the birthplace of Frida Kahlo and is a microcosm of Mexico, let’s not leave the rest of the country out of the picture! There’s a lot more to fall in love with outside of the (former) D.F. Mexico in the world’s most populated Spanish speaking country; not to mention, each one of its citizens has a different story to tell about what makes the country special. Whether you study intensive Spanish in Cuernavaca or realize how little you knew about Mayan culture in the Yucatan Peninsula, studying abroad in Mexico will teach you that there is always more to learn.

My latest piece on Go Abroad is live. Check it out!

Mita’s Secrets to Long-Distance Love

I don’t often do creative writing, but when I do, I’m a Nicaraguan grandmother (a “mita”) giving Peace Corps Nicaragua volunteers advice through my column in the Va Pué volunteer magazine. Here, I answer this question:

Querida Mita,

What is the key to a long distance relationship? I have never had to do one before, but I am about to.


Querida Muchacha,

Fijese que…

There’s an old saying that goes amor de lejos, amor de pendejos. Why would you do that to yourself? Oh well, chavalos y chavalas these days are moving so much que andan como pata de perro that I understand why you’re doing a long distance relationship.

In my 73 years, I’ve seen my family and those of my neighbors separated because Continue reading “Mita’s Secrets to Long-Distance Love”

What I learned from teaching in Marseille, France

When I read Alexandra Tracy’s piece about working while studying abroad in France on Travel Latina, our similar yet vastly different experiences struck me. I also wanted to learn more about teaching in Marseille.

As Latinas, both of us have studied abroad in Aix-en-Provence (I went for five months in 2011). Other than that, we spent our time differently. I had a short stay, so I took university courses, I didn’t find a job and I spent most of my free time traveling or watching Anthony Bourdain episodes. I had an insanely generous program that gave me a monthly stipend, and while I loved every second of traveling, I didn’t meet as many locals as I could’ve. By teaching in Marseille for eight months, Alexandra integrated into French culture in profound ways. Find out what it was like for her to teach youth of color in Marseille. Teaching-Marseille-France